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Everyone thought that following up on the success of the Game Boy would be difficult. Nintendo made it look easy, and the Game Boy Color was a roaring success.

The Game Boy Color didn’t stick around as long as the original Game Boy, though. Within three years, attention had firmly shifted to Nintendo’s next handheld, the Game Boy Advance.

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The Games

Thanks to the Game Boy Color’s backwards-compatibility with the original Game Boy, the console had squillions of games available right from day one. As with the Super Game Boy converter for the Nintendo SNES, gamers could add colour washes to many Game Boy games.

Many early Game Boy Color ports were colourised versions of Game Boy games, although sometimes Ninty were good enough to throw in a couple of extra features or levels to make splashing out twice for the same game that bit less painful.

As time went on, though, the GBC built up quite a collection of must-have games, including Metal Gear Solid: Ghost Babel, R-Type DX and Donkey Kong Country.

People

Gunpei Yokoi (link to follow)

A short biography of the man who brought us the D-pad, portable gaming and a really rather natty robotic hand.

Thanks

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Major events

21 October 1998
Japanesed release of the Game Boy Color
November 1998
US release of the Game Boy Color
27 November 1998
UK release of the Game Boy Color

Emulators

Mac OS X

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iOS

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OUYA/Android

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Features

Backwards-compatible with the Game Boy
Custom 8MHz 8-bit Z80 processor
Graphics: 160×144, 32,768 colour palette (10, 32 or 56 colours on screen at any one time, depending on the graphics mode)
Sound: 4 channel sound
Screen: Colour TFT display
Serial and IR communication ports
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