header_holding

The Dragon 32 was released in 1982 -the boom year for 8 bit computers – by Dragon Data, a subsiduary of Welsh toy company Mettoy. The Dragon was able to carve out a small but significant foothold in the market thanks to supply problems faced by Sinclair and Acorn. There’s lovely.

The Dragon series shared many hardware similarities with Tandy’s Coco, and porting software between the two systems was a relatively painless affair.

The Games

Microdeal were one of the few software companies to stick by the Dragon, and released a series of games starring ‘Cuthbert’ which were all blatantly ripped-off… sorry, influenced by classic arcade and console games of the time

People

Imagine: The Name of the Game (link to follow)
Liverpool’s Imagine Software probably had the highest profile of all the early 8-bit games publishers. Unfortunately for them, all the hype and tabloid articles weren’t enough to save them from bankrupcy when the videogames crash happened. The Imagine brand was later bought by Ocean Software who used it to market their line of arcade conversions.

Romik Software (link to follow)
When you look back, it’s all too easy to focus on the big names software scene and forget about some of the smaller players. Romik were never going to win any awards for quality, but they supported a wide range of 8-bit computer formats and were a well-known during the early-to-mid 1980s.

Links

Dragon Data
Dedicated to the Dragon series. Includes game reviews and cover art, as well as comprehensive information about Dragon hardware.

Major events

August 1982
Dragon 32 launched for £200

August 1983
Dragon 64 launched in the UK (£225) and US (US$399)

June 1984
Dragon Data go into liquidation

Emulators

Mac OS X

Content to follow
Aware of an emulator for this platform that we should mention? Let us know!

iOS

Content to follow
Aware of an emulator for this platform that we should mention? Let us know!

OUYA/Android

Content to follow
Aware of an emulator for this platform that we should mention? Let us know!

Features

Dragon 32

0.89MHz 8-bit 6809E CPU
32K RAM
Built-in Extended Microsoft Color BASIC
Graphics: 9 colours, 5 display modes, up to 256×192
Sound: 1 voice, 5 octaves (using BASIC), 4 voices, 7 octaves (using machine code)
‘Real’ full-travel keyboard
2 analogue joystick ports

Dragon 64

As above, except with 64K RAM and a built-in RS232 interface.

Dragon Professional

The Professional never made it to market. Prototypes featured two built-in 3.5″ disk drives.